Why Stop When You’re Winning?

Why Stop When You’re Winning?

Why Stop When You’re Winning?

Why would you let the fear of losing something you don’t even have yet drive your decision process. It’s not a winning strategy.

Fear is a self-fulfilling prophecy. The fear of losing becomes more of a factor in decision-making than any actual risks—and that fear philosophy causes pressure and self-doubt that distract you from dealing with the very real 400 pound juggernaut looking to run over you. Oh, the irony!

I’m thinking here watching the Jacksonville Jaguars lose to the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship game. I started seeing a change in blitz calls from the Jags in the end of the third quarter on, more zone coverage, not the tight man-to-man defense that had worked for them in the first half. The defense had had Tom Brady on his heels up until then, but once they had Pro Bowl Tight End, Rob Gronkowski, out of the game, everything just changed. Was it fear? Did Jacksonville sabotage their own game because they were afraid of losing? I don’t know. I’m not them.

But they ditched a strategy that was working in favor of a new strategy that didn’t, and they lost. Why would you do that? Panic, most likely. I see it all the time.

Why? Why would you let the fear of losing something you don’t even have yet drive your decision process? Why?

Don’t do it.

When your game plan is working, stay with it.  Get out of your own way and let the initiatives and the plans you have worked on pan out. Even the littlest tweaks with the best intentions can derail things. Before you make an adjustment to anything ask yourself some of these questions:

  • Am I over-reacting to one person’s feedback?
  • Am I getting distracted by a new, prettier, option in front of me?
  • Am I being sold something here because I love to fiddle?
  • What is the ROI if the new plan works?
  • What could happen if the new plan bombs?

 

Please do not misinterpret me. I am not saying don’t look for ways to improve things. But be purposeful, do your research, and be patient. If you’re winning, make small adjustments, but avoid major course changes.

Talk to your clients and make sure these principles make sense to them as well.

And go Steelers, Ha!

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Image of Thurston Armbrister was taken by Keith Allison under the Creative Commons 2.0 ShareAlike license 

This Charlotte Business Owner Focuses On One Case at a Time
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